Transport travesty

PT

What the f**k is wrong with people? Is it not common courtesy to stand up for people who are elderly, have a disability, are pregnant or have small children? Or in fact, anyone who looks like they need or deserve to sit down more than you?

If that’s the case, then why do so many people chose to sit in seats reserved for these people. I don’t mind people sitting there but it’s a temporary seat and should be treated as such.

When someone walks onto the train in need of a seat, these people just look down – pretending they don’t see you.

To those people, you are disgusting. You are a sad person and quite frankly I hope someone stamps on your foot. Catching public transport is no easy task for any regular commuter.  So being seven and a half months pregnant makes it just that little bit more tricky – it’s not like I’m in the early stages and people are playing fat or preggo – there is a baby in here, it’s pretty f**king obvious.

This morning was a prime example of that.

I catch the train to work every morning from Carnegie station between 7.20am and 7.45am (it just depends on what type of morning I’m having).

This morning I waited patiently for the train and when it turned up it was fairly full.

I patiently waited while a handful of other people pushed passed me and onto the train but when I went to board no one moved. No one.

I literally stood there while people just stared at me and made no attempt to move down into the aisles.

I felt like yelling ‘um, are you serious? Move the f**k down’.

I backed away from the train thinking, it’s ok, I’ll just get the next one.

It was at this point I texted my husband.

“Sometimes I can’t get on the train because it’s too full and I’m too big” followed by a sad face.

The next train rolled in and I got on, moving to a semi-safe place where I could at least hold on to a rail.

I was standing in front of four men, four young men all sitting in seats reserved for people in need.

And not one of them moved. Not one.

They just looked down, pretending not too see my 33 week belly almost poking them in the face.

There’s a saying which goes ‘if looks could kill’, well let me tell you – I was staring holes into their heads thinking ‘look at me, I dare you’.

It’s not that I necessarily am in dire need of sitting down, but seriously, whatever happened to just being considerate?

And more to the point, it’s dangerous to be standing. What if the train stops suddenly? What if I faint? What if someone falls on me?

We had just left South Yarra station when one woman sitting at the back of the carriage said ‘Oh, would you like to sit down?’

I told her thank you very much but I’m getting off at the next station. But I couldn’t resist by saying “it would have been nice if all these people (referring to said four men still sitting) had looked up, it’s quite sad really”.

I got off at the next stop and I actually felt like crying.

I’m about to bring a baby into this world. A world where people no longer show the respect and kindness that I’m sure has been shown to them on at least one occasion in their lives.

I’m no parenting expert but I’ll be damned if I bring up my baby the way these people seem to have been brought up.

And as for the sign that says “on request these seats should be vacated” – not on request, grow a pair and get off your arse – fool.

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4 thoughts on “Transport travesty

  1. Oh, I’m not subtle about it. I get on a tram and tap someone on the shoulder and MAKE them get up. People are rude douchebags and pretend they don’t see or hear you but I have no time for that. Plus usually when I get on public transport, I’m grumpy at the fact that I’m going to work anyway 😛

  2. I use a walking stick so can relate to your comments about a visible disability, BUT, as a male who has been taught not to regard a woman as an object, and never to “openly” notice her “body” or mammalian artefacts, it does seem a little odd that I am now permitted to notice that she is pregnant.

    If I comment to another person about how lithe a woman looks I can be cast as sexist.

    Can the noticing of a woman who is encumbered be any less so?

  3. “You are a sad person and quite frankly I hope someone stamps on your foot.”

    I think the sad person here is the pregnant woman who’s forced to stand up. I’m willing to bet the one sitting down is quite content.

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